Diploma in Justice

 

Purpose

The purpose of the Hope College justice diploma is to help operationalize the mission and objectives of Hope College by providing students with an educational experience that will position them to be qualified for entry level correctional services positions or to be able to pursue the extension of their educational experience to the completion of a baccalaureate degree.

Uniqueness

The Hope College justice diploma will offer students a number of unique pedagogical experienced including:

  • relatively small student:instructor ratios offering close mentoring throughout the program;
  • immediate access to local practicum placements at the Drumheller Institution, a Federal Medium Security Correction Service Centre;
  • delivery in a rural context with an acute sensitivity of issues related to living and working in rural communities;
  • instructional practitioners – individuals not only qualified to teach but proven correction service professionals;
  • student practicum placements in both the first and second year of the program;
  • a flexible curriculum that allows instructors to ensure that students are exposed to leading edge ideas and needs in correctional services.

Course Title: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System – JT101

This course is the foundation of the Justice Diploma and introduces students to the Canadian Criminal Justice System. As an introduction, this course will examine the multiple systems that comprise the Criminal Justice System as a whole. Students will be introduced to Investigations and Enforcement Entities, Provincial and Federal Courts and Corrections Systems through an interactive learning process that follows case studies from inception to the criminal world to judicial processing and finally to reintegration of offenders. Students will analyze and discuss the functionality of the system and engage in critique of the system by reviewing relevant reform initiatives.

Course Title: Principles of Canadian Law and Justice – JT102

This course examines the basic functioning, development, implementation and administration of the law in Canada. The course focuses on major pieces of legislation that regulate the administration of Justice in Canada and examines the various types of laws and courts designated to address them. The topics that will be discussed include: basic human rights and freedoms; constitutional law; criminal, contract, tort laws; and administrative law. Through an integrated participation module the course will further examine the court system and the functions of judges, lawyers and the basic elements of legal reasoning.

Course Title: Introduction to Correctional Services and Principles – JT103

This course introduces students to the Canadian Correctional System and the principles on which it operates. The course will focus on the fundamental laws and statutes that govern corrections both Provincially and Federally as well as discuss the mandates and roles of non-governmental agencies. The course will evaluate the principles of rehabilitation, punishment, and reintegration and the various ways these are carried out in both the Canadian context as well as through comparative analysis with other systems globally. Students will also engage in learning some of the new trends of correctional philosophy in Canada and abroad.

Course Title: Introduction to Criminology – JT104

This course examines the development of Criminology as a social science and focuses on crime causation, criminal typologies and criminalization, the evolution of criminal theorizing, delinquency, rehabilitation and treatment, and victimization. The course will also examine and analyze the variety of ways in which crime is measured, detected and understood by different segments of the population.

Course Title: Justice Practicum – JT111

As a mandatory aspect of the Justice Diploma in Corrections Program students must participate in two structured field placements within a Correctional Facility. This practical component will provide students with an experiential opportunity to apply the theory, knowledge, values and skills learned in the classroom setting within the actual workplace and routine of a Correctional worker.

Course Title: Applied Corrections I – JT201

This seminar-style course will provide students with an opportunity to engage with topics that are experiential based allowing students to discuss, critique and analyze Corrections by providing an outlet to discuss the interjections of theory, policy and practice. Applied Corrections I will support students through their first practicum placement and will discuss overall topics related to their experience such as, Static and Dynamic Security, Prison Architecture and Supervision Philosophies, Offender Movement, Offender Needs, Role of Correctional Staff, Prison Operations and, Security Typologies and Classification. This course will be partly lecture taught and partially student led and may also include guest lecturing from industry professionals.

Course Title: Applied Corrections II – JT202

Following up on Applied Corrections I this seminar-style course will provide students with an opportunity to engage with topics that are experiential based and enables students to discuss, critique and analyze Corrections by providing an outlet to examine the interjections of theory, policy and practice. Applied Corrections II will support students through their second practicum placement and will discuss topics with more analysis. Students will discuss Offender Needs, Offender populations and, risk management and monitoring. Students, through presentation and participation, will compare institutional processes, analyze the role of the Correctional Officer within the institutional framework and critically reflect on their experiences.

Course Title: Youth and Crime – JT203

This course provides students with an examination of the social and legal ramifications of youth involved in criminal behaviour. This course provides an overview of the social construction of youth deviance and theoretical explanations for youth offending. The course also provides an in-depth analysis of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the roles and responses of police, courts, corrections and community agencies in response to youth crime. A series of other related topics will also be introduced.

Course Title: Theories of Justice – JT204

This course focuses on the diverse theoretical foundations of justice, justice legislation, policy and practice in Canada. Students will engage with different perspectives on enforcement, rehabilitation and reintegration of criminals and discuss how these perspective have gave way to our current Criminal Justice System. Also discussed will be alternatives to incarceration, reformative measures, community responses to crime and rehabilitation and restorative justice initiatives.

Course Title: Justice Practicum – JT211

As a mandatory aspect of the Justice Diploma in Corrections Program students must participate in two structured field placements within a Correctional Facility. This practical component will provide students with an experiential opportunity to apply the theory, knowledge, values and skills learned in the classroom setting within the actual workplace and routine of a Correctional worker.

Course Title: Principles of Intervention and Risk – JT223

This course introduces students to the principles of behaviour change and rehabilitation while enforcing the principles of risk and risk management. Students will be introduced to various industry methods of assessing risk, both actuarial and assessment based, and gain experience managing the risk of offenders in differing settings. The risk/need principle will be evaluated as a method of sentence planning and rehabilitative decision-making. Different intervention and monitoring options are discussed and critically evaluated as students gain experience in applying the principles of risk and intervention to the planning of reintegration.

Course Title: Crime, Culture and Society – JT224

This course will examine the influence that society and culture has on the administration of Corrections and the overall understanding of crime in Canada. The course will focus on the historical changes of crime related policies over the past century and analyze the changing perspectives in culture and society. The course will also examine crime and corrections as policy making phenomenon and understand how politics then constructs crime and rehabilitation in Canada and internationally. The social and cultural constructions of crime will also be discussed from a cultural, religious and media standpoint.

Course Title: Special Topics in Corrections – JT225

This course is designed to address current trends and specific topics current to the administration of Corrections in Canada. This course may be team taught with guest lecturers to enhance the students understanding of the concepts, theories and policies that embody the current issues faced by various facets of the Correctional systems. Topics may include: Mental health/other health issues; addictions management; the aging offender population; understanding, working with female offenders and female offender management principles; offender typology; gangs; high-profile offender management; victims, both incarcerated and in the community and; any other emergent topics.